Contractor doubles down on Celli Power Harrow

Matt Wood says his Celli Energy 300 power harrow is built tough and is a good machine for working in hill country.

Otago contractor Matt Wood recently bought his second Celli Energy 300 power harrow after he found his first one to be reliable, tough and great value for money.

Click here to learn more about Celli power harrow features and benefits.

Celli Power Harrow - Energy-P

Matt runs MW Contracting from his home in Outram, where he also leases 310 hectares for beef cattle, dairy grazing and store lambs.

He started contracting nine years ago and does cultivation, gorse mulching and breaking in new ground. Matt had never owned a Celli power harrow before buying his first Energy 300 model two and-a-half years ago, but he has been impressed with the machine’s reliability.

“Our previous power harrows cost a lot of money to run and we found that people didn’t really stand behind the warranties on them,” he says.

The Celli Energy 300 did not disappoint and does a great job breaking in tough new ground.

“It’s very good. It has got an oil cooler in it, which is a good feature. It saves on heat and lack of heat means less wear,” says Matt. “The oil comes out clean, so you don’t have any issues in the gearbox.”

The Celli Energy 300 features a heavy gearbox, with a fully welded gear bed that offers greater rigidity and ensures the gears run true at all times.

The power harrow has 12 rotors, rather than 10, over a 3.0m width, which contributes to the fine seed bed finish.

“It has rotor protectors so silage wrap and wire doesn’t wrap around and damage the spindles and bearings,” Matt says.

“It’s a shorter machine as well and it flows better on the hills. It doesn’t put too much pressure on the packer roller when it goes through a gully.”

Watch Scott Capper from Farmgard deconstructing the Celli power harrow here.

Matt bought both of his Celli Energy 300s from Daniel Thompson at Otago Farm Machinery, and he says they offer great service and backup support.

Read the full article in the August/September issue of Rural Contractor and Large Scale Farmer Magazine.